Ascophyllum nodosum,Fucus gardneri,Fucus vesiculosus,Fucus distichus,Fucus evanescens

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Desclocation

Ascophyllum nodosum

Ascophyllum nodosum is a brown seaweed closely related to Fucus. It forms a sile bladders centrally in lo, strap-like fronds. The fronds ha downwards, gently drapi sheltered intertidal rocks. A number of fronds grow from each basal holfast, and the plant generally regenerates new fronds from the base when one of the larger fronds are damaged, so that the stands you see on the shore may be very persistant indeed. Reproduction takes place in beautiful yellow receptacles in spri (below). These develop in reponse to short days in the autumn, mature duri the winter, and are at their most prolific in spri. Eggs and sperm are released into the water, and the eggs release a low molecular weight sperm attractant known as Finnavarene, named for the village of Finavarra ("wood by the sea") in north Co. Clare in Ireland. DistributionAscophyllum is currently confined to the North Atlantic basin. Although plants have been found from time to time in San Francisco Bay, the species does not persist there. The plants are used as p

Location/common name:- Asco Sea Whistle Bladderwrack algue noueuse ascophylle ascophylle noueuse ascophylle noueu

Ascophyllum is currently confined to the North Atlantic basin. Although plants have been found from time to time in San Francisco Bay, the species does not persist there. The plants are used as packi for shellfish from the North Atlantic and when discarded may briefly establish populations. lower mid-littoral

Uses

yllum is used for the extraction of a href= ../uses_general/alginates.php alginic acid/a, a polysaccharide used in foods and in biotechnology. Plants are sustainably harvested in Norway, Ireland and Iceland. In Connemara, it is cut sustainably by hand for high-quality meal for animals, and as an agricultural fertilizer. Some 20,000 t are currently harvested sustainably by hand in the region since 1940s and transported by road to a dryi plant at Cill Chiaráin (Kilkerrin, Co. Galway) in Connemara on the west coast of Ireland run by a href= http//www.arramara.ie/ target= _blank Arramara Teo./a Beds are cut on a 4- or 5-year cycle dependi on local conditions as determined by the experienced harvesters.

Fucus vesiculosus

Mid-shore wrack easily recognised by its paired bladders occurri on either side of a prominent midrib. The frond is generally not stly spiralled and the receptacles do not have a sterile rim (a href= Fucus_spiralis.php Fucus spiralis/a and a href= Fucus_guiryi.php F. guiryi/a), and the frond does not have a serrated margin (a href= Fucus_serratus.php Fucus serratus/a). Fucus vesiculosus is attached by a small, stly attached disc which gives rise to a short stipe. The reproductive receptacles are swollen area at the tips of fronds that have many flask-shaped cavities called conceptacles. These house the male and female reproductive structures known as antheridia (borne on antheridiophores) and oogonia (containi 8 eggs), respectively. The eggs and sperm are liberated onto the surface of the receptacles and a pheromone (sex-attracti substance) is released by the eggs that attracts the sperm. Fertilization results in a zygote that forms a new Fucus adult. bDistributionThis species is common in the North Atlantic south to the C

Location/common name:- Bladderwrack black tang black tany bladder fucus dyers fucus fucus tips fucus vésiculeux g

This species is common in the North Atlantic south to the Canary Islands. A bladderless form occurs on more wave-exposed shores in the NE Atlantic (last picture below). bUsageFucus vesiculosus is used in cosmetic preparations and in thalassotherapy. lower mid-littoral

Uses

vesiculosus is used in cosmetic preparations and in thalassotherapy.